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Leaving is only part of the battle…

2019-08-08T07:41:38+10:00

Fraser Coast Chronicle Article 8 June 2018CEO of Red Roses Foundation and domestic violence specialist Betty Taylor said when a person starts strangling someone else, they’re pretty serious about killing them. “If women don’t die from that initial strangulation event, they can still die anywhere up to a year later from blood clots, strokes and more. “The average time it took a woman to die was four months after strangulation.”  

Leaving is only part of the battle…2019-08-08T07:41:38+10:00

Our choking victims need support as sex loophole exposed

2019-08-08T07:48:50+10:00

Article by Sherele Moody IT'S been many years since a trusted man tried to choke the life out of Jacque Lachmund, but she remembers the assault like it was yesterday. Struggling to breathe, her windpipe crushed under his strong hands and her body frozen in fear, Ms Lachmund said she let her body go limp as she pretended to pass out. The "playing dead" ruse worked, with the attacker letting the successful businesswoman go when her body went limp.... read more in the links below: ROCKHAMPTON https://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/news/rocky-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loophole/3412143/ SURAT https://www.suratbasin.com.au/news/our-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loophole-e/3412138/ BUNDABERG https://www.news-mail.com.au/news/bundy-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loophole/3412134/ WARWICK https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/warwick-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loopho/3412131/ MACKAY https://www.dailymercury.com.au/news/mackay-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loophol/3412119/ IPSWICH https://www.qt.com.au/news/ipswich-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loopho/3412118/ GYMPIE https://www.gympietimes.com.au/news/gympie-choking-victims-need-support-as-sex-loophol/3412117/ GLADSTONE https://www.gladstoneobserver.com.au/news/gladstone-choke-victims-need-support-as-sex-loopho/3412114/ [...]

Our choking victims need support as sex loophole exposed2019-08-08T07:48:50+10:00

The ultimate form of control

2019-08-09T15:33:39+10:00

The ultimate form of control Until she lost her daughter, Sonia Anderson had no idea how common the act of strangulation was — or why so many could get away with it. By TRENT DALTON Sonia Anderson. Picture: Justine Walpole From The Weekend Australian Magazine April 21, 2018 17 MINUTE READ Ever since her daughter Bianca died she has choked on the S-word. Some warped physiological aftershock of loss. Eight years of grieving sucked up from her gut and through her heart and into a voice box that won’t spit that one awful word out. Sonia Anderson stands in the place where her daughter, [...]

The ultimate form of control2019-08-09T15:33:39+10:00

Institute’s role to stop domestic violence stranglers

2019-08-09T15:33:58+10:00

Domestic violence: Strangulation can prove fatal months after attack, studies show Chris Clarke, The Courier-Mail May 14, 2017 12:00am DOMESTIC violence campaigners are calling on victims of strangulation to seek urgent medical attention after discovering research that suggests victims can die months later. The State Government recently obtained studies that suggest victims are susceptible to blood clots and an increased risk of stroke leading to death. Health Minister Cameron Dick is reviewing the information and said it could pave the way for new measures to determine how domestic violence victims are assessed at the scene. The research was brought to Mr [...]

Institute’s role to stop domestic violence stranglers2019-08-09T15:33:58+10:00

Domestic violence laws passed in Queensland to make non-fatal strangulation a separate offence

2019-08-09T15:14:21+10:00

Domestic violence laws passed in Queensland to make non-fatal strangulation a separate offence By Gail Burke Updated 20 Apr 2016, 11:01am Laws have been passed that make non-fatal strangulation and suffocation a new, separate offence in Queensland in a bipartisan move to reduce domestic violence. State Parliament last night passed the changes, which could see offenders jailed for seven years. A woman's first-hand account of her husband's attempt to kill her. "The new offence reflects that this sort of violence is not only inherently dangerous, but is predictive of an escalation in domestic violence offending, including homicide," Attorney-General Yvette D'Ath said. "The [...]

Domestic violence laws passed in Queensland to make non-fatal strangulation a separate offence2019-08-09T15:14:21+10:00
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